Category Archives: Photo Album

Ramesses the Great

A colossus of Ramesses II, currently in the British Museum.
A colossus of Ramesses II, currently in the British Museum.
A Colossus of Ramesses II
A Colossus of Ramesses II

The naturally occurring 'pyramid-shapped mountain' in Thebes ("The peak al-qurn ". Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikipedia)
The naturally occurring ‘pyramid-shapped mountain’ in Thebes (“The peak al-qurn “. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikipedia)
The Mortuary Temple of Ramesses II in western Thebes (Photo by Steve F-E-Cameron),
The Mortuary Temple of Ramesses II in western Thebes (Photo by Steve F-E-Cameron),
A photo capturing UNESCO's effort to relocate the Abu Simbel temples.
A photo capturing UNESCO’s effort to relocate the Abu Simbel temples.
This fallen statue of Ramesses II from the Ramesseum was the inspiration for Shelly's poem 'Ozymandias' (Photo by Hajor).
This fallen statue of Ramesses II from the Ramesseum was the inspiration for Shelly’s poem ‘Ozymandias’ (Photo by Hajor).
An aerial view of the Ramesseum  (Photo by Steve F-E-Cameron),
An aerial view of the Ramesseum (Photo by Steve F-E-Cameron),
The Mortuary Temple of Seti I at Abydos (Photo by Zanaq)
The Mortuary Temple of Seti I at Abydos (Photo by Zanaq)
The smaller temple at Abu Simbel dedicated to Hathor and Nefertari (Photo by Ad Meskens)
The smaller temple at Abu Simbel dedicated to Hathor and Nefertari (Photo by Ad Meskens)
To the left is the larger temple dedicated to Ramesses the Great; to the right is the smaller temple dedicated to Hathor and Queen Nefertari (Photo by Holger Weinandt).
To the left is the larger temple dedicated to Ramesses the Great; to the right is the smaller temple dedicated to Hathor and Queen Nefertari (Photo by Holger Weinandt).
An image of the Battle of Kadesh from Abu Simbel.
An image of the Battle of Kadesh from Abu Simbel.

Amarna Art

Fragment and sculptors study of faces of mouth and nose, NK, 1351-1334, Amarna, Sandstone and Gips (AM 21207 and AM 21234)

Beautiful examples of the realism and detail characteristic of later Amarna art.

Musee_national_-_alexandrie_akhenaton

Here you can see Akhenaten’s elongated face and chin. Also notice the large ears.

Nefertiti

An example of early Amarna art from before the move to Akhetaten. Notice how this piece has of a caricature feel that two previous pieces. This radical style softened over time.

Akhenatenb

Notice the body here on Akhenaten, the lead figure. He is show with wide hips and what appear to be breasts. Also note the spindly legs and arms. Notice how his physical features are almost the exact same as Nefertiti, who is standing behind him.

Akhenatena

In this colossal statue you can really see the prominent chin and elongated face. These images were very shocking to the Egyptologists who first found them. They are simultaneously familiar and alien.

ReliefPortraitOfAkhenaten01

A piece from earlier in the Amarna period. The features are sharper here than in many of the examples above. Also note the ear plugs, one of the new additions to the Amarna art style that adds a realism and daily life feel to the style, while the strange image also indicates something different and alien.

tiye

I just had to include the stern visage of Queen Tiye. This is a wonderful piece from later in the period that really communicates personality. Note how dark her skin is. Traditional depictions of women depicted them with yellow skin. This is another innovation of the period.

Akhenaten from the Met

Another early example of Amarna art form Karnak. The radical break with previous styles seems to indicate, at least to me, that Akhenaten had a new and distinct artistic vision.

409px-Nofretete_Neues_Museum

The beautiful bust of Nefertiti. Not just a high point of the Amarna style, but one of the most beautiful piece from all of the ancient Near East.

Picture 779

An unfinished statue of Akhenaten. The three dimensional statue really highlights the feminine nature of his body.

Portrait heads of Nefertiti and Akhenaten, NK, Amarna, Gipsstuck, (AM 21349 and AM 21348) 2

Two portrait busts found at Amarna. These have much more realism than traditional Egyptian art.